Aggravated Kidnapping for Man Holding Own Family Hostage

Aggravated Kidnapping Man Holds Family Hostage

Photo: Evans-Amos/Wikimedia Commons

A man who was arrested last month after a tense police standoff has been charged with aggravated kidnapping among numerous other felony and misdemeanor charges. The man had been holding his family hostage with a box cutter.

Not His First Run-in With the Law

According to a report from KSL News, on Tuesday, Feb. 24, Keaton Darrell Yeates, 24, was arrested after forcing his way into his parents’ home after they refused to take him to see his ex-girlfriend. The charging documents filed in Third District Court on Friday, March 6, stated that Yeates smashed his head through a wall and then broke down a door. He then forced his mother, sister, and two of his sister’s male friends into one of the bedrooms and told them they couldn’t leave, wielding a box cutter. The box cutter is what turned the charge from regular kidnapping to aggravated kidnapping.

One of the male friends received a cut from Yeates when the friend tried to stop Yeates from harming himself with the box cutter. The incident led to a police standoff, and when Yeates went to a window to speak with the police, everyone but the mother was able to escape. Officers were able to get into the home and subdue a resisting Yeates.

The final charges were five counts of aggravated kidnapping, two counts of assaulting an officer, aggravated abuse of a vulnerable adult, aggravated assault, two counts of domestic violence in the presence of a child, child abuse, interfering with an arresting officer, and two counts of criminal mischief.

This isn’t Yeates’ first run-in with the law. In October, Yeates was arrested for smoking marijuana and being in possession of oxycodone while visiting his grandmother at a nursing home.

[For more information, click “Man Arrested for Marijuana Possession in a Retirement Center”]

Aggravated Kidnapping a First Degree Felony

According to Utah Criminal Code 76-5-302, in Yeates’ case, aggravated kidnapping occurs “if the actor [Yeates] in the course of committing unlawful detention or kidnapping … possesses, uses, or threatens to use a dangerous weapon.”

Aggravated kidnapping is a first degree felony, the most serious of the felony charges, punishable by five years-to-life in prison. If the suspect actually causes serious bodily injury to another or has a previous grievous sexual offense, they could be sentenced to life without possibility of parole.

If you or someone you know has been charged with aggravated kidnapping, don’t leave “life” in the hands of a public defender (especially life without parole). Contact an experienced criminal defense attorney who will look out for your best interests.


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