Impaired Driving – The Reduced DUI Charge for Utah Drivers

Utah drivers who are arrested for a DUI need to know there’s a chance they may be offered a reduced charge known as impaired driving. Although this charge is slightly better than a DUI, it is best to consult with a criminal defense attorney to find out if it is the best option available.

Don’t settle without legal counsel

DUI

Photo by: SanDiego DUIAttorney

When a driver is arrested for a DUI, they may accept whatever charges are thrown at them; this is a major mistake that many Utah drivers make. There is a possibility that a DUI charge can be reduced to impaired driving instead. The option for this reduced charge is not something the prosecution will always offer voluntarily, so it is encouraged to have an educated attorney on your side can help ensure this option is available to those who qualify. If a prosecutor willingly and swiftly offers a plea bargain of impaired driving, it is best to consult with an attorney before agreeing as there may be a better option out there.

DUI-Driving under the influence

A DUI is what Utah Code 41-6a-502 defines as “driving under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or a combination of both or with specified or unsafe blood alcohol concentration”. A person may face a DUI charge if they operate a vehicle with a blood or breath alcohol concentration of .08 grams or higher. They may also face a DUI charge if they are under the influence of alcohol or drugs which would “render the person incapable of safely operating a vehicle.” If someone is arrested for a DUI, it is considered a class B misdemeanor and the guilty party can plan on spending at least 48 hours of jail time, losing their Utah’s driver’s license, and dishing out a hefty fine.

DWI – driving while impaired (impaired driving)

Impaired Driving

Photo by: SanDiego DUIAttorney

DUI and impaired driving; these two terms may sound like different ways of saying the same thing, but there are slight differences that are important to understand. Impaired driving is considered a reduced DUI charge of one degree and according to Utah Code 41-6a-502.5, “[w]ith the agreement of the prosecutor, a plea to a class B misdemeanor violation of [a DUI] may be entered as a conviction of impaired driving ( . . . ) if:

a) The defendant completes court ordered probation requirements; or

b) (i) the prosecutor agrees as part of a negotiated plea; and

(ii) the court find the plea to be in the interest of justice.”
Those facing impaired driving charges are less likely to spend time in jail and will usually have a smaller fine.

Additionally, those facing impaired driving charges will typically either have their driver’s license suspended for half the time of what can happen with a DUI or they may not lose their license at all.

Not for everyone

Not all DUI charges have the potential for being reduced to an impaired driving charge. These plea deals are saved for those who are first time offenders without a criminal history. If someone is hurt or if a minor is in the vehicle at the time of arrest, then a DUI charge will not decrease but increase instead to a class B misdemeanor. If a person is seriously injured because of someone negligently driving under the influence, then the charges can increase even higher to a third degree felony. This is the same charge for repeat offenders with two or more convictions of a DUI or impaired driving within the last 10 years. Regardless of whatever charges a defendant is facing, a criminal defense attorney will help ensure the best possible outcome for his client.

One Beer per Hour Rule May Still Result in a DUI

It is a common misconception that drinking only one beer per hour will keep an individual within the legal limit to avoid a DUI. Regardless of what online blood alcohol concentration (BAC)
calculators tell you, they cannot honestly predict how a person’s body will react to one beer or glass or wine, thus incorrectly predicting their blood alcohol concentration and putting them at risk for DUI charges.

Photo by: Patrik Kristian

Photo by: Patrik Kristian

BAC calculator or “drink wheel”

There are several sites online where a person can enter their gender, height, weight, and drinks consumed resulting in a predicted blood alcohol concentration percentage. Unfortunately, many people trust these calculators and are surprised when they still end up with a DUI.

Other factors to include

Beyond gender, height, weight, and number/types of drinks consumed, there are several other aspects that can play a part in affecting blood alcohol concentration. These include:

With or without food. When someone drinks on an empty stomach they usually feel drunk right away. This is because there is nothing in the stomach to slow the absorption of alcohol so it isimmediately absorbed into the stomach lining. Drinking with a full stomach results in a slower absorption of alcohol, causing a person to feel the effects of drinking gradually. By slowing down the absorption rate however, BAC levels are also decreased slower, remaining elevated longer than expected.

Photo by: brando.n

Photo by: brando.n

Fat or muscle. When entering a person’s weight in a BAC calculator, it should also include body fat percentage. Someone who has higher muscle content will be able to absorb the alcohol swifter than someone with high body fat due to the lack of water in the fat cells. Thus, someone with high body fat may be more likely to get a DUI if they trust a BAC calculator to determine their BAC levels.

Alcohol metabolism rate. According to the U.S. Department of Health, alcohol metabolism is “the way in which alcohol is broken down and eliminated by the body.” Everyone is different and we all metabolize alcohol at different rates depending on our level of enzymes that break down alcohol. BAC calculators work on averages only and shouldn’t be trusted to know everyone’s exact rate of metabolizing alcohol.

Don’t chance a DUI

DUI Breathalyzer

Photo by: KOMUnews

Due all the different factors that could affect the way alcohol is metabolized in the body, it is recommended to not take chances of incurring DUI charges by trusting anything other than a breathalyzer. If you drink-phone a friend, call a cab, or sleep it off. If you are already facing DUI charges, contact a criminal defense attorney immediately.

Saratoga Springs Bus Driver Arrested For Possible DUI

A bus driver transporting special needs children in Saratoga Springs Utah was arrested last week for a possible DUI.

DUI or unsure footing?

DUI

Photo by: ThoseGuys119

52 year old Sherry Lund was transporting a small group of special needs kids from an Alpine School District elementary when a parent noticed her stumble getting a child off the bus. Allegedly, Lund did not recover immediately from her fall and stayed on the ground while the parent called police. By the time officers arrived, Lund had reentered the bus and left.

No breathalyzer test reported

When officers located Lund, they detected the smell of alcohol. No information has been given regarding whether or not she was given a breathalyzer, however Lund supposedly failed a field sobriety test. Lund, who has served as a bus driver for two decades, was placed on administrative leave and arrested for a possible DUI.

Field sobriety test

Field Sobriety Test

Photo by: Jeffrey Smith

More information may come to light during the investigation of Lund’s supposed DUI; however as of now her arrest is said to be based off of the alcohol smell and a failed field sobriety test. Field sobriety tests such as walking a straight line or saying the ABC’s backwards have been under scrutiny lately with experts stating that the tests may produce a false DUI. This can be due to an innocent mistake either by the arresting officer or the individual suspected of a DUI.

Wait for a legitimate test

Photo by: KOMOnews

Photo by: KOMOnews

When a DUI is suspected, waiting for a legitimate test such as a breathalyzer or a blood or urine test is encouraged. No one is legally required to participate in a field sobriety test and with their high fail rate, they are more than likely a waste of time. If a test of breath, blood, or urine does confirm an alcohol limit over what is legally allowed, a criminal defense attorney is recommended.