Corn Bait and Chumming on Utah Waters

Using corn when fishing in Utah has been against the law for several years, however the DWR has determined that corn bait is now allowed on select Utah waters while chumming is still not permitted.

Corn bait

Photo by: Doug Waldron

Corn is an inexpensive, yet effective bait choice for Utah fishermen yet was outlawed until the beginning of 2017 when the Department of Wildlife Resources made changes on the allowance of corn when fishing. It was previously believed that corn and hominy were harmful to fish and could result in gastrointestinal problems such as bloating and intestinal blockage, eventually leading to death. Through extensive research however, it has been determined that the only risk associated with using corn while fishing is an elevated chance of a fish taking the delicious corn bait.

Trial basis

Fishing Guidebook

Photo by: Dennis Sitarevich

In a type of trial run, the DWR is allowing corn bait to be used on select Utah waters known to have carp and kokanee salmon, both of which love corn. The 2017 Fishing Guidebook defines those corn friendly waters as: “Cutler Reservoir, Deer Creek Reservoir, Electric Lake, Fish Lake, Flaming Gorge, Lake Powell, Stateline Reservoir or Utah Lake”. They also note that “throughout the pilot study, Division biologist and law enforcement officers will be monitoring these areas closely to see if the use of corn should be expanded or discontinued.”

Chumming

Chumming

Photo by: James Mostert

Although using corn for bait is now allowed on a trial basis, chumming with corn is not. According to the current Fishing Guidebook, “Chumming means dislodging or depositing in the water any substance not attached to a hook, line or trap, which may attract fish.” Throwing a handful of corn or other bait in the water in hopes of attracting fish is a violation of Utah Code 23-20-3 which states “a person may not: ( . . . ) possess or use bait or other attractant to take protected wildlife”. Chumming could result in a class B misdemeanor charge as well as a violation and fine for littering in a waterway. Before heading out fishing this summer, residents are encouraged to read up on the 2017 Fishing Guidebook and contact the Utah Department of Wildlife Resources for any clarifications on current fishing laws.

How Using Speech Imitation Software Wrong Could Get a Person Thrown in Jail

There is new speech imitation software being created that is making voice cloning easier to do while sounding more realistic. Users beware: certain uses of speech imitation could get a person thrown in jail.

Speech recognition

Speech Imitation

Photo by: Antonio Silveira

Speech recognition is used by millions of Americans every day. Those from older generations who are not savvy on texting may use speech to easily send messages for them. Others frequently use Siri, Alexa, Samsung’s new Bixby, and Google Assistant to ask questions, get directions, order items, and otherwise include these AI assistants to have an active part in their technological lives. These systems are created to recognize a user’s voice and even adjust to better understand voice patterns. After correctly understanding the user’s speech, these AI assistants answer back in their semi-robotic tones, even going as far as to crack a few AI jokes. Now the speech recognition and computer speaking capabilities have gone to an entirely new level by speaking back to us in our own voices.

Speech imitation software

Photo by: SparkCBC

There have been a few different types of speech imitation software on the market, however none of them compare to what the company Lyrebird is creating. Using AI technology, the Canadian company Lyrebird uses a mere 60 second recording of a person’s voice in order to generate thousands of words and phrases. The troubling difference between these older versions of speech imitation software and those produced by Lyrebird, is the voices produced by Lyrebird sounds more realistic, losing the robotic sounds of other AIs. Already on the heels of Lyrebird are other advanced speech imitation software such as VoCo by Adobe, CandyVoice, and VivoText which plans on letting users choose the level of emotion portrayed through the imitated speech.

Illegal uses of the software

Now that this near flawless speech imitation software is here, imitating the speech of people could give user’s hours of entertainment; however it can also come with legal repercussions as well.

• If speech imitation is used to “expose any other living person to public hatred, contempt, or ridicule” and the person “knowingly communicate[d] to any person orally or in writing any information which he knows to be false” as is stated in Utah Code 76-9-404, the person using the voice cloning technology could end up with a class B misdemeanor charge for criminal defamation.

Photo by: Blogtrepeneur

•Speech imitation software could be used to commit identity fraud. Many security measures use other means of protection besides a password. This can include iris or fingerprint scanners as well as facial recognition or voice bio-metrics security software. Voice cloning could open doors for criminals to obtain private information about others or to gain access to otherwise secured accounts. According to Utah Code 76-6-1102, identity fraud is either a third or second degree felony, depending on “the value of the credit, goods, services, employment, or any other thing of value”.

• One crime that can arise from speech imitation software is impersonation of an officer. Whether done as a joke to scare a friend or for more malicious intent, pretending to be an officer in person or by voice can result in charges. Utah Code 76-8-512 states those guilty of impersonating an officer will face class B misdemeanor charges, punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine up to $1,000.

Photo by: CPOA

• One of the most malevolent ways speech imitation software could be used is by making it sound like someone admitted to committing a crime. If used this way, the person whose voice was imitated may be the one facing criminal charges. Since voice recordings may be used in court unless there is a lack of predicate, an imitated recording of someone confessing to a crime could mean the difference between whether or not someone goes to jail for a crime they didn’t commit.

• All the criminal charges detailed above can also be accompanied by civil charges brought on by the individuals who were victimized by the speech imitation.

Imitate responsibly

As with any technology, users should always follow the guidelines that would accompany speech imitation software and refrain from using the software illegally. For more information on legal ramifications of speech imitation, contact a criminal defense attorney.

Licensing Required for “Almost Massage” Businesses in Utah

Alternative healing is growing in popularity and businesses that offer their customers any services that could be seen as “almost massage” are required to have proper licensing.

“Almost Massage”

Almost Massage

Photo by: alfonso.saborido

With consumers seeking natural methods of healing, many businesses offering alternative medicine are popping up with techniques that are could be seen as “almost massage”. One of these  techniques is known as Reiki which originated in Japan and is an alternative medicine used to balance the flow of a person’s life energy. During a Reiki session, the person administering it hovers their hands above the other person’s body or lightly touches the body, waiting a few seconds per possession to allow the energy to flow. The claim is the flow of energy is what heals and relaxes.

Prostitution stings

Utah has been inundated lately with illegal activities taking place at local massage parlors.  Massage parlors aren’t the only businesses where sexual solicitation is taking place. Unfortunately, there are some businesses who have used natural healing such as a Reiki as a façade for illegal prostitution activities. In an attempt to rid Utah of prostitution hiding behind massage businesses, the law regarding massage licensing has been changes to include all types of massage. Although Reiki and other “almost massage” businesses do not involve soft-tissue massage or sometimes even direct touch, they are now required to be licensed according to Utah law.

Utah law revised

The Massage Therapy Practice Act of Utah was revised in 2012 with HB114. Now, according to Utah Code 58-47B-102, any person or businesses that practices any form of massage must be licensed. This includes those who manipulate soft-tissue and others who are “providing, offering, or advertising a paid service using the term massage or a derivative of the word massage, regardless of whether the service includes physical contact.” Although this revised law has been in place for over five years, it continues to catch individuals and businesses by surprise. The charge for someone practicing any form of massage without a license is a class A misdemeanor; this charge carries worse penalties than the class B misdemeanor a person can receive for prostitution.  For anyone who is facing criminal charges for prostitution or practicing “almost massage” without a license, contact a criminal defense attorney today.