Aggravated Robbery Suspect Robbed Same Pharmacy Once Before

aggravated robbery suspect robbed same pharmacy

Photo: DWT110/Wikimedia Commons

On Wednesday, March 18, a La Verkin man who was arrested following the March 11 robbery of a Hurricane pharmacy was charged with more than just aggravated robbery for that incident. He was also given additional charges for a previous robbery at the same location almost a year earlier to the date.

Don’t Return to the Scene of the Crime, Especially not to Rob it Again

According to an article in KSL News, just before noon on March 11, Jonathan S. Forest, 37, entered the Hurricane Family Pharmacy, displayed what was later discovered to be an airsoft gun, and made demands for prescription medication.

A witness to the robbery followed Forest after he left the pharmacy. A call to 911 resulted in an arrest of Forest within 6 minutes of the robbery. Forest had the prescription medication and black airsoft gun on his possession. This led to the original charge of aggravated robbery.

However, between his arrest and conviction on March 18, officers were able to link Forest to another robbery of the same pharmacy on March 31, 2014. After obtaining a search warrant for Forest’s place of residence, detectives located evidence “consistent with the first robbery.”

As a result of these new discoveries, Forest was charged with aggravated robbery, aggravated assault, and nine counts of possession of a controlled substance.

Airsoft Guns Still Result in Aggravated Robbery

According to the Utah Criminal Code 76-6-302 as it applies to this story, aggravated robbery is defined as the act of someone carrying out a robbery and in the process, using or threatening to use “a dangerous weapon as defined 76-1-601.” In that article of the Utah Criminal Code, a dangerous weapon is defined as “any item capable of causing death or serious bodily injury.”

While some may question whether an airsoft gun could cause “serious bodily injury,” the article goes on to define a dangerous weapon as “a facsimile or representation of the item, if…the actor’s use or apparent intended use of the item leads the victim to reasonably believe the item is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury; or the actor represents to the victim verbally or in any other manner that he is control of such an item.”

Aggravated robbery is considered a first degree felony, punishable by anywhere from five years to life in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. If you know someone who has been charged with aggravated robbery, don’t leave that wide interpretation of punishment in the hands of a public defender. Contact an experienced criminal defense attorney.

Aggravated Kidnapping for Man Holding Own Family Hostage

Aggravated Kidnapping Man Holds Family Hostage

Photo: Evans-Amos/Wikimedia Commons

A man who was arrested last month after a tense police standoff has been charged with aggravated kidnapping among numerous other felony and misdemeanor charges. The man had been holding his family hostage with a box cutter.

Not His First Run-in With the Law

According to a report from KSL News, on Tuesday, Feb. 24, Keaton Darrell Yeates, 24, was arrested after forcing his way into his parents’ home after they refused to take him to see his ex-girlfriend. The charging documents filed in Third District Court on Friday, March 6, stated that Yeates smashed his head through a wall and then broke down a door. He then forced his mother, sister, and two of his sister’s male friends into one of the bedrooms and told them they couldn’t leave, wielding a box cutter. The box cutter is what turned the charge from regular kidnapping to aggravated kidnapping.

One of the male friends received a cut from Yeates when the friend tried to stop Yeates from harming himself with the box cutter. The incident led to a police standoff, and when Yeates went to a window to speak with the police, everyone but the mother was able to escape. Officers were able to get into the home and subdue a resisting Yeates.

The final charges were five counts of aggravated kidnapping, two counts of assaulting an officer, aggravated abuse of a vulnerable adult, aggravated assault, two counts of domestic violence in the presence of a child, child abuse, interfering with an arresting officer, and two counts of criminal mischief.

This isn’t Yeates’ first run-in with the law. In October, Yeates was arrested for smoking marijuana and being in possession of oxycodone while visiting his grandmother at a nursing home.

[For more information, click “Man Arrested for Marijuana Possession in a Retirement Center”]

Aggravated Kidnapping a First Degree Felony

According to Utah Criminal Code 76-5-302, in Yeates’ case, aggravated kidnapping occurs “if the actor [Yeates] in the course of committing unlawful detention or kidnapping … possesses, uses, or threatens to use a dangerous weapon.”

Aggravated kidnapping is a first degree felony, the most serious of the felony charges, punishable by five years-to-life in prison. If the suspect actually causes serious bodily injury to another or has a previous grievous sexual offense, they could be sentenced to life without possibility of parole.

If you or someone you know has been charged with aggravated kidnapping, don’t leave “life” in the hands of a public defender (especially life without parole). Contact an experienced criminal defense attorney who will look out for your best interests.

Salt Lake City Robbery Derailed by Clerk with Ax Handle

Salt Lake City Robbery Derailed

Photo: Utah, Salt Lake City

A man who attempted the robbery of a Salt Lake City convenience store on Sunday, Nov. 23, apparently chose the wrong store. The clerk fought back with an ax handle, and the suspect is now in jail on charges of robbery and aggravated assault.

Speak Softly and Carry a Big Stick

According to a report from KSL News, on Sunday morning at approximately 3:30 a.m., the suspect, a 23-year-old male whose name hasn’t been released, entered a Salt Lake Maverik Country Store. In addition to not listing the suspect’s name, the report didn’t state whether the man had a weapon, however, it would seem that he didn’t because the clerk refused his demands for money.

When the suspect came behind the counter and threatened the clerk, the clerk struck the suspect several times in the head with an ax handle. The suspect got the weapon at some point, chasing the clerk around the store before fleeing after the clerk escaped the store. An unsuccessful robbery indeed.

Salt Lake Police Lt. Michael Ross stated that they received a call not long after about a man bleeding from his head. Aided by the identification of the suspect by the Maverik clerk, the police arrested the man, took him to the hospital for treatment of the head wounds, then booked him into the Salt Lake County Jail for robbery and aggravated assault.

Robbery Charges Discussed

The fact that the suspect is only being charged with robbery is further evidence that he most likely didn’t have a weapon (otherwise it would be aggravated robbery). According to Utah Criminal Code 76-6-301, in this case the suspect may be guilty of robbery if he “unlawfully and intentionally takes or attempts to take personal property in the possession of another from his person, or immediate presence, against his will, by means of force or fear”. Even though the suspect wasn’t successful, the key word is “attempts.”

Robbery is considered a second degree felony, punishable by up to 15 years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. If you or someone you know has been charged with robbery, you don’t want to get the full brunt of this charge. Contact an experienced criminal defense attorney who will work on your behalf.