Violation of a Restraining Order

When a judge issues a restraining order, that is a court order for a person to stay away from a specific individual and violation of a restraining order may land the restricted person in jail.

Reasons for issuing a restraining order

Photo by: Rob!

Photo by: Rob!

A restraining order, otherwise known as a protective order, is typically placed against a person who is deemed a threat to another individual. Issuing of restraining orders can stem from charges such as:

• Domestic violence
• Stalking
• Sexual assault
• Physical assault
• Harassment
• Threats
• Human trafficking
• Issues with former employees

How a restraining order works

Restraining order hearings sometimes take a while, so if an individual feels that they are in immediate danger from another person, they can have a judge issue a temporary restraining order. The temporary restraining order must be given, or served, to the restricted person in order for it to be valid. This is typically done by a member of the local police department or court system. This temporary restraining order is usually good for a couple weeks to give the individual time to get a permanent restraining order. Depending on the case; once served, the restricted person may be constrained from:

• Calling, texting, or otherwise trying to communicate with the protected individual.
• Going to the individuals home or place of employment
• Having contact with minor children
• Being within a certain amount of feet from the protected individual. This can mean that the restricted person must leave a public place such as a store if they see that the protected individual is there.

Violation of a restraining order

If the restrained person tries to contact the individual, it is considered a violation of a restraining order. Utah Code 77-36-2.4 states “A law enforcement officer shall, without a warrant, arrest an alleged perpetrator whenever there is probable cause to believe that the alleged perpetrator has violated any of the provisions of an ex parte protective order or protective order [restraining order]”. Violation of a restraining order is a class A misdemeanor. For more information on charges stemming from restraining orders, call a criminal defense attorney.