Utah College Student Arrested on Campus for Prostitution

A Utah college student was arrested for prostitution over the weekend at her campus dorm room.

Struggling student?

Prostitution

Photo by: Washington County Sheriff’s Office

18 year old Ramajeh Marie Patrick who lives on Dixie State University campus in student housing was arrested March 10th 2017 after a lengthy investigation by campus police. There had been reports of multiple middle aged men seen on campus security footage wandering around campus after hours before ending up in Patrick’s dorm room. During the investigation, an online ad was located in which Patrick advertised prostitution. An undercover officer posed as a John and met Patrick at her dorm room, where she was then arrested by officers on scene for prostitution as well as running a massage business without a license.

Prostitution

Utah Code 76-10-1313 states “A person is guilty of sexual solicitation [prostitution] when the person:
a) Offers or agrees to commit any sexual activity with another person for a fee, or the functional equivalent of a fee;
b) Pays or offers or agrees to pay a fee to another person to commit any sexual activity; or
c) With intent to engage in sexual activity for a fee or to pay another person to commit any sexual activity for a fee engages in, offers or agrees to engage in, or requests of directs another to engage in any of the following acts:
i. Exposure of a person’s genitals, the buttocks, the anus, the pubic area, or the female breast below the top of the areola;
ii. Masturbation;
iii. Touching of a person’s genitals, the buttocks, the anus, the pubic area, or the female breast; or
iv. Any act of lewdness. ( . . . )”

Penalties-expected and unexpected

Photo by: Klaus Pichler

Photo by: Klaus Pichler

Prostitution is a class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1000 dollar fine. Strangely enough, the charge Patrick is facing for giving massages is considered a greater offense. Running a massage business without a license is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to a full year in jail and a $2,500 fine; More than double the jail term and fine amount possible for prostitution. The details released of the investigation do not include whether or not Patrick was even being investigated for running a massage business, but she confessed to it as well as prostitution when she was being questioned by campus police. Unfortunately, Patrick’s case is another good example of why it is always best to consult with a criminal defense attorney before admitting to anything.

Utah Couple Facing Voyeurism Charges after Using Drone to Invade Privacy of Neighbors

A Utah couple is facing class A misdemeanor voyeurism charges after they used a personal drone to invade the privacy of their neighbors.

Nosy drone

Photo by: Andrew Turner

Photo by: Andrew Turner

39 year old Aaron Dennis Foote of Orem, Utah and his 34 year old girlfriend Terisha Lee Norviel were arrested after a neighbor saw the drone filming through his open window, seized the unmanned aircraft, and handed it over to police. Authorities discovered the drone had been used to film multiple people while in their bedrooms and/or bathrooms on single level as well as multiple level residences. Police were able to quickly apprehend Foote and Norviel after using info collected by the drone including a picture of Foote’s face as well as his license plate.

Voyeurism

According to Utah Code 76-9-702.7, there are various penalties associated with voyeurism. The penalty for voyeurism is a class B misdemeanor if the person “views or attempts to view an individual, with or without the use of any instrumentality;

(a) With the intent of viewing any portion of the individual’s body regarding which the individual has a reasonable expectation of privacy, whether or not that portion of the body is covered with clothing;

(b) Without the knowledge or consent of the individual; and

(c) Under circumstances in which the individual has a reasonable expectation of privacy.”

That charge is increased to a Class A misdemeanor if the victim of voyeurism is a child less than 14 years of age.

Voyeurism using concealed electronic equipment

VoyeurismWhen concealed electronic equipment such as a hidden camera or a spy drone outside a window is used to commit voyeurism, the charge is increased to a class A misdemeanor or third degree felony if the voyeurism is committed against a child under 14 years of age. Again, the charges remain the same based strictly on intent. Whether or not the person committing voyeurism succeeded in viewing the private areas of the other individual(s) body remains irrelevant.

Criminal penalties

According to Utah State Courts:

• a third degree felony is punishable by up to five years in prison and a $5,000 fine;

• a class A misdemeanor carries a possible jail term of up to one year plus a $2,500 fine;

• Class B misdemeanors are punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Anyone facing charges for voyeurism, with or without a drone, should consult with a criminal defense attorney to discuss any felony or misdemeanor charges.

Utah Police Find Five Pounds of Marijuana Candy after Responding to a Reported Theft

Police officers in Vineyard, Utah were responding to a report of a theft and ended up finding five pounds of marijuana candy instead.

Think before you call

Marijuana Candy

Photo by: Jorge Romero

20 year old Taylor Sauers of Vineyard, Utah called police to file a report regarding a theft of a handgun, cash, and other valuables from his apartment. When police arrived at the residence, they noted an obvious marijuana odor coming from inside. The smell of marijuana was considered enough probable cause for a search warrant, and when officers returned to search the property, they located nearly five pounds of marijuana candy in the form of gummy bears.

Second degree intent to distribute marijuana candy

Sauers is facing a second degree felony for intent to distribute the marijuana candy, along with two class B misdemeanor charges related to possession and paraphernalia. No information was released regarding the stolen goods, however the large lump sum of money missing is assumed to be drug money and Sauers will not be able to own the handgun anyway if his felony charge sticks. The young adult is likely regretting his call to police, which turned out worse for him that it did for the thief.

One to 15 years

Photo by: houstondwiPhotos mp

Photo by: houstondwiPhotos mp

A second degree felony in the state of Utah carries a possible prison term of one to 15 years in prison as well as a $10,000 fine. Each class B misdemeanor may tack on an additional $1,000 and six month behind bars if sentences run consecutively. With 15 plus years on the line, Sauers and anyone else charged with intent to distribute marijuana candy or any other illegal drugs are encouraged to seek legal counsel.