70 Year Old Utah Woman in Jail for Criminal Solicitation Hires a Hitman on Witness

A 70 year old Utah woman who was in jail for trying to have her ex-husband and his wife killed back in 2016 is facing new charges of criminal solicitation after again attempting to hire a hitman; This time however, the targets were the former hitman who was a witness to the case against her and an attorney in different case.

Criminal investment

Photo by: 401(k) 2012

Linda Gillman (then 69 years old) of Herriman, Utah hired a handyman in 2016 to kill her ex-husband and his new wife. Gillman allegedly had a life insurance policy out on her ex-husband worth millions of dollars. Instead of carrying through with the plan, the hitman contacted the police who then arrested Gillman and charged her with criminal solicitation for murder.

Up to her old tricks

While already in jail for criminal solicitation, Gillman again tried to hire someone to commit murder for her. This time however, Gillman wanted her former hitman who was now a witness in the case taken out. Additionally, an attorney in an unrelated civil case was on Gillman’s hit list. Gillman had approached another inmate of the Salt Lake County Jail and offered to bail them out if they would complete the hits and destroy evidence in the case. Instead, the potential hitman (or hitwoman) went to authorities and Gillman was charged again with criminal solicitation.

Criminal solicitation

Photo by: Andrés Nieto Porras

Utah Code 76-4-203 states “An actor commits criminal solicitation if, with intent that a felony be committed, he solicits, requests, commands, offers to hire, or importunes another person to engage in specific conduct that under the circumstances as the actor believes them to be would be a felony or would cause the other person to be a party to the commission of a felony.” The penalties for criminal solicitation depend on the crime being solicited. In most cases, the penalties are one degree lower than the actual crime itself. In regards to criminal solicitation of a first degree felony that is “punishable by imprisonment for life without parole” such as murder, the penalty would also be a first degree felony.

Criminal Solicitation Charges for Elderly Utah Woman Who Hired a Hit Man

An elderly Utah woman is facing criminal solicitation charges after she hired a hit man to murder her former husband and his wife.

The angry ex-wife

Photo by: Victor

Photo by: Victor

69 year old Linda Gillman of Herriman Utah was arrested for criminal solicitation after police received information from someone stating the elderly Utah woman was trying to hire them to murder her ex-husband and his wife. Authorities then recorded multiple conversations between Gillman and the hired hit man where murder scenarios as well as funding for the hit were discussed. Police determined they had enough evidence to arrest Gillman for criminal solicitation.

Criminal solicitation

Utah Code 76-4-203 states: “An actor commits criminal solicitation if, with the intent that a felony be committed, he solicits, requests, commands, offers to hire, or importunes another person to engage in specific conduct that under the circumstance as the actor believes them to be would be a felony or would cause the other person to be a party to the commission of a felony. An actor may be convicted under this section only if the solicitation is made under circumstances strongly corroborative of the actor’s intent that the offense be committed.”

Penalties

Criminal Solicitation

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The charges for hiring someone to commit a felony are severe, with penalties usually only one degree below those of the crime that is being contracted out. For instance, if someone hired another to commit a second degree felony, they would face a third degree felony. According to Utah Code 76-4-204, these charges of a lesser degree do not take place when the crime being solicited is murder; rape, object rape or sodomy of a child, or child kidnapping;

Don’t even think about it

Hiring someone else to do a person’s dirty work does not lessen the chance of criminal charges for that person who is soliciting a crime. In fact, an individual can face charges for criminal solicitation even if the crime was never carried out. They can be punished for their part in the hiring, planning, and funding of said crime. For those who have made the grave error to hire someone to commit a felony or for those who have accepted and carried out such felony, an experienced defense attorney is recommended.