Utah Veteran with History of Making Threats Arrested For Sending a Biological Toxin to Government

A Utah veteran with a history of making threats against government officials was arrested after he sent letters to the President, the Pentagon, and a Texas Senator containing a substance that tested positive for a biological toxin.

Disgruntled citizen

Photo by: Andy Rennie

39 year old William Clyde Allen III of Logan, Utah who is a former member of the United States Navy was arrested on multiple federal charges after he sent envelopes containing crushed up castor beans, the source of the biological toxin ricin, to government and state officials. Allen also claimed to have sent similar letters to top officials in other countries as well. This wasn’t Allen’s first threat against the government. Within the last four years, Allen has also made death threats against the President and a threat of mass destruction against a military base in Texas. During the most recent incident involving the mailed substance, Allen undeniably went too far and is now facing federal charges of threatening to use a biological toxin.

Biological weapons

While Allen’s previous threats turned out to be nothing more than him taking a troubling approach to expressing frustration, they have now escalated from verbal and written intimidation to threats accompanied by a deliberate action to cause injury or death. 18 U.S. Code § 175 states “Whoever knowingly develops, produces, stockpiles, transfers, acquires, retains, or possesses any biological agent, toxin, or delivery system for use as a weapon, or knowingly assists a foreign state or any organization to do so, or attempts, threatens, or conspires to do the same, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for life or any term of years or both.”

Lack of mental clarity

While Allen could be facing life in federal prison for his biological attack, some question Allen’s mental awareness and whether or not he fully understands the gravity of the situation. For starters, he didn’t actually obtain the poison ricin. What he had was castor beans that he bought off the internet and sloppily ground up and distributed to random government officials. Accompanying the chunky powder substance, which wasn’t harmful in its current state, were notes that appeared to make a nod toward the fairy tale, Jack and the Beanstalk. Additionally, Allen seemed more upset at missing his weekend plans than he did to spending his life in federal prison. His behavior doesn’t necessarily reflect someone who intended the worst with a biological weapon. Hopefully the penalty for this outlandish scheme includes a mental health evaluation and the necessary psychological help he so obviously needs.

Lawyers Arrested For Money Laundering After Baiting and Suing Porn Downloaders

Two lawyers and a sidekick were arrested for money laundering after authorities unraveled a plot the trio had created to bait illegal porn downloaders in order to turn around and sue them.

Legal knowledge

Photo by: Woody Hibbard

Minneapolis, MN lawyer Paul Hansmeier along with his brother Peter Hansmeier and co-conspirator John Steele used their legal expertise to not only sue individuals for pirating pornography, but to plant the movies on file sharing websites for the unsuspecting individuals to find. Hansmeier and accomplices created or obtained rights to pornographic movies before uploading the files to sites known for pirating movies. They then waited for downloaders to take the bait. Once the movies were downloaded, the trio claimed to be representing the companies who created the movies and sued those caught pirating. After collecting a three grand each settlement from hundreds of thousands of online downloaders, the million dollar illegal business was finally discovered and shut down.

Fraud and money laundering

Photo by: Chris Potter

After extorting the individuals pirating porn for nearly six million dollars, the phony legal team was busted and charged with fraud as well as federal charges for money laundering. Money laundering has been considered a federal offense since the Money Laundering Control Act of 1986 was passed. Section 1956 of the Act states: “Whoever, knowing that the property involved in a financial transaction represents the proceeds of some form of unlawful activity, conducts or attempts to conduct such a financial transaction which in fact involves the proceeds of specified unlawful activity. . . With the intent to promote the carrying on of specified unlawful activity; . . . knowing that the transaction is designed in whole or in part . . . to conceal or disguise the nature, the location, the source, the ownership, or the control of the proceeds of specified unlawful activity . . . shall be sentenced to a fine of not more than $500,000 or twice the value of the property involved in the transaction, whichever is greater, or imprisonment for not more than twenty years, or both.“ Hopefully with their background in the legal field, the criminal charges brought against the extortionists came as no surprise.

Theft Ring Busted For Robbery of ATM Machines in Utah

Multiple members of a theft ring were busted for robbery of ATM machines in Utah, almost getting away with thousands of dollars in cash.

Welcome to Utah

Photo by: Tax Credits

Authorities in Utah were closely watching 6 men of Venezuelan nationality after the group flew into Salt Lake International airport and then took separate rental cars only to meet up at a local bank together. There were then observed jackpotting multiple ATM machines in Cottonwood Heights and Sandy. Four of the men were apprehended in Utah, two later in Miami, and the other is still at large.

Jackpotting

Jackpotting is a newer crime to the United States but is quickly becoming a popular way for thieves to rob a bank without ever stepping foot inside. Jackpotting occurs when the outer casing of an ATM is either broken or a key is used to obtain access to the computer inside. The internal hard drive of the ATM machine is then removed briefly in order for the thief to install malware on it. The malware is then activated, often by an outside source which could be a higher up member in the theft ring. Once the hard drive is bugged, it is then reinstalled back into the ATM machine, allowing the thieves to breach the ATM security system and empty the machine of all of its cash.

Computer fraud and robbery

The individuals arrested for pilfering the ATM machines in Utah were booked on federal charges of computer fraud as well as robbery of a bank- the two crimes that are committed during jackpotting of an ATM. Utah has been hit by two different jackpotting rings since November of last year and it is likely this form of bank robbery will continue to increase if security measures for ATMs are not upgraded soon.