Three Utah Women Arrested For Felony Obstruction of Justice for Helping Fugitive Evade Police

A manhunt in Herriman finally ended with the arrest of the fugitive as well as felony obstruction of justice charges for three Utah women who helped him evade police custody.

Police manhunt

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In late January startled residents of the town of Herriman, Utah were told to shelter in place and local schools were put on lockdown as police attempted to locate a 33 year old man who had shot at police, broke into a home, shot the homeowner, and then got away in a stolen vehicle. Justin Gary Llewelyn was eventually caught five days later after another police chase successfully ended with a dramatic PIT maneuver from an pursuing officer.

Help from family

Llewelyn will face numerous charges for his violent acts towards police and the public, but there are three women that are also facing charges for their part in the story. 50 year old Tasha Llewelyn, 24 year old Misty Llewelyn, and 35 year old Keria Jessica Hartley-Johnson who are all likely relatives of Justin Llewelyn are facing felony charges of obstruction of justice after they helped their fugitive relative elude investigators.

Obstruction of justice

Utah Code 76-8-306 states, “An actor commits obstruction of justice if the actor, with intent to hinder, delay, or prevent the investigation, apprehension, prosecution, conviction, or punishment of any person regarding conduct that constitutes a criminal offense:

Photo by: Orin Zebest

a) provides any person with a weapon;
b) prevents by force, intimidation, or deception, any person from performing any act that might aid in the discovery, apprehension, prosecution, conviction, or punishment of any person;
c) alters, destroys conceals, or removes any item or other thing;
d) makes, presents or uses any item or thing known by the actor to be false;
e) harbors or conceals a person;
f) provides a person with transportation, disguise, or other means of avoiding discovery or apprehension;
g) warns any person of impending discovery or apprehension;
h) warns any person of an order authorizing the interception of wire communications . . . ;
i) conceals information that is not privileged and that concerns the offense, after a judge . . . has ordered the actor to provide the information; or
j) provides false information regarding a suspect, a witness, the conduct constituting an offense, or any other material aspect of the investigation.”

Felony charges for helping a fugitive

Knowingly helping a friend, family member, or an acquaintance skirt being arrested by police comes with hefty charges, especially if the person being helped has committed serious offenses.
• If the charges the fugitive is trying to evade are capital or first degree felonies such is the case with Justin Llewelyn, anyone helping them faces second degree obstruction of justice.
• If the charges being dodged are second or third degree felonies and the helper prevents another from aiding authorities, removes or adds things that could be used during the investigation, or helps hide a person or aid in their escape, that accomplice could face a third degree felony.

• If someone assists a person in avoiding any charges lesser than a first degree felony and they give the fugitive a weapon, they may also face a third degree felony.

• Any other case of obstruction of justice is a class A misdemeanor.

All three women were found to have helped Llewelyn evade police custody either by hiding him, lying to officers or otherwise getting in the way of the investigation. They have all been charged with second degree obstruction of justice and are looking at a possibility of up to 15 years in prison and a fine as high as $10,000. For legal aid regarding obstruction of justice charges or any other charged related to being an accomplice to a crime, contact a criminal defense attorney.

Criminal Solicitation Charges for Elderly Utah Woman Who Hired a Hit Man

An elderly Utah woman is facing criminal solicitation charges after she hired a hit man to murder her former husband and his wife.

The angry ex-wife

Photo by: Victor

Photo by: Victor

69 year old Linda Gillman of Herriman Utah was arrested for criminal solicitation after police received information from someone stating the elderly Utah woman was trying to hire them to murder her ex-husband and his wife. Authorities then recorded multiple conversations between Gillman and the hired hit man where murder scenarios as well as funding for the hit were discussed. Police determined they had enough evidence to arrest Gillman for criminal solicitation.

Criminal solicitation

Utah Code 76-4-203 states: “An actor commits criminal solicitation if, with the intent that a felony be committed, he solicits, requests, commands, offers to hire, or importunes another person to engage in specific conduct that under the circumstance as the actor believes them to be would be a felony or would cause the other person to be a party to the commission of a felony. An actor may be convicted under this section only if the solicitation is made under circumstances strongly corroborative of the actor’s intent that the offense be committed.”

Penalties

Criminal Solicitation

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The charges for hiring someone to commit a felony are severe, with penalties usually only one degree below those of the crime that is being contracted out. For instance, if someone hired another to commit a second degree felony, they would face a third degree felony. According to Utah Code 76-4-204, these charges of a lesser degree do not take place when the crime being solicited is murder; rape, object rape or sodomy of a child, or child kidnapping;

Don’t even think about it

Hiring someone else to do a person’s dirty work does not lessen the chance of criminal charges for that person who is soliciting a crime. In fact, an individual can face charges for criminal solicitation even if the crime was never carried out. They can be punished for their part in the hiring, planning, and funding of said crime. For those who have made the grave error to hire someone to commit a felony or for those who have accepted and carried out such felony, an experienced defense attorney is recommended.