Bad Acid Trip Ends in Attempted Murder with a Meat Cleaver

A bad acid trip in Orem, Utah ended in one man missing an ear and the other facing charges for attempted murder with a meat cleaver.

LSD and weapons

Photo by: Jordi Sabaté

30 year old Mackenzie Ulibarri and 27 year old Jordan Smith were allegedly tripping on acid together when an altercation broke out between the two roommates. Reports state Ulibarri was upset with Smith being loud and echoing the same phrases repeatedly. The way these mannerisms were viewed was likely to be enhanced due to the effects of the hallucinogens and Ulibarri claimed to be scared by his roommate’s behavior. He then fired a weapon at Smith and when that didn’t work, he attacked him with a meat cleaver. Smith suffered several injuries, including one of his ears being detached completely. Ulibarri was arrested on multiple charges including attempted murder.

Attempted murder

Utah Code 76-4-102 states “Criminal attempt to commit [murder] . . . is a first degree felony punishable by imprisonment for an indeterminate term of not fewer than three years and which may be for life”. Utah Code 76-4-101 adds “a person is guilty of an attempt to commit a crime if he:

(a) Engages in conduct constituting a substantial step toward commission of the crime; and
(b) (i) Intends to commit the crime; or
(c) (ii) When causing a particular result is an element of the crime, he acts with an awareness that his conduct is reasonably certain to cause that result.”

Awareness while hallucinating?

When an individual is under the influence of a hallucinogen such as LSD, there is usually little to no awareness of reality. The National Institute on Drug Abuse states: “some hallucinogens interfere with the action of the brain chemical serotonin, which regulates:

• Mood
• Sensory perception
• Sleep
• Hunger
• Body temperature
• Sexual behavior
• Muscle control

Other hallucinogens interfere with the actions of the brain chemical glutamate, which regulates:

• Pain perception
• Responses to the environment
• Emotion
• Learning and memory”

NIH goes on to note: “short-term effects of some hallucinogens include: . . .

• Mixed senses (such as “seeing” sounds or “hearing” colors)
• Spiritual experiences
• Feelings of relaxation or detachment from self/environment . . .
• Panic
• Paranoia – extreme and unreasonable distrust of others
• Psychosis – disordered thinking detached from reality”.

With such an overall effect on a person’s physical, mental, and emotional state, it is not surprising to note that someone tripping on acid may not have the awareness necessary to know what they are doing or what the consequences of their actions may be.

Temporary, yet voluntary insanity

When someone makes the conscious choice to partake in a substance known to skew a person’s reality or decision-making skills even to the point of making them temporarily insane, they are also taking the responsibility of any criminal activity they may perform while under the influence of that substance. According to Utah Code 76-2-305, “It is a defense to a prosecution under any statute or ordinance that the defendant, as a result of mental illness, lacked the mental state required as an element of the offense charged. . .[however] A person who asserts a defense of insanity or diminished mental capacity, and who is under the influence of voluntarily consumed, injected, or ingested alcohol, controlled substances, or volatile substances at the time of the alleged offense is not excused from criminal responsibility on the basis of mental illness if the alcohol or substance caused, triggered, or substantially contributed to the mental illness.”

Criminal defense

Those individuals who are facing charges stemming from criminal actions while under the influence of alcohol or drugs such as hallucinogens are encouraged to seek legal counsel from an experienced attorney who can help find valid defense opportunities pertinent to each specific case.

Utah Man to Mental Hospital after Attempted Murder

A Utah man is on his way to the state mental hospital for a spell before serving time in prison for attempted murder of a fellow motorcyclist.

Traffic violation or attempted murder charge?

Photo by: Bill & Vicki T

Photo by: Bill & Vicki T

In August of 2013, 57 year old James Alan Reynolds of Enoch Utah refused to stop for a police officer during a routine traffic stop. The short chase ended with Reynolds crashing his motorcycle into a car, but not before he fired a series of random shots at another motorcyclist. 21 year old Austin Sharp of Santa Clara Utah, who had no known affiliations with Reynolds, was shot twice in the back.

Random and almost deadly

Reynolds was originally facing multiple charges including discharging a firearm from a vehicle and fleeing from police, but it was ultimately decided last week that he will serve time for the more serious of his offenses, attempted murder of the young fellow motorcyclist Austin Sharp.

First stop, mental hospital

Photo by: floodllama

Photo by: floodllama

Since Reynolds was determined not mentally ready to be added to the prison population, he will be spending an indefinite amount of time in the Utah State Mental Hospital. If ever it is decided that he is of sound mind, he will be transferred to the Utah State Prison to serve his time for attempted murder.

1st Degree Felony

Attempted murder by causing serious bodily injury during the felony discharge of a weapon is a 1st degree felony, and punishable by up to life in prison. Unfortunately for everyone involved, Reynolds was clearly not mentally healthy when he made the choice to shoot at a random person, and now two lives are changed forever. For more information on any criminal charges call an experienced defense attorney. For issues pertaining to mental health that could lead to criminal charges, contact the Utah Mental Health Services in your area.