Utah Man Waives Miranda Rights, Admits to Murder and Scrubbing Crime Scene

An Ogden Utah Man was arrested after he waived his Miranda rights, openly admitting to murdering a woman and scrubbing the crime scene.

Criminal homicide

Photo by: Rynerson Bail Bonds

The deceased body of an adult woman was found lying in some brush on the side of a road in South Ogden last Monday. The woman appeared to have several stab wounds, and police on scene were unable to locate a suspect or a weapon. Officers proceeded to the woman’s apartment nearby and spoke to her roommates who agreed to accompany officers to the station to be interviewed.

Waived Miranda Rights

Prior to the police interview, one of the roommates named Jesus Martinez Ramos Jr was read his Miranda Rights, warning him that anything he said could be used against him while reminding him he could request an attorney to represent him. Ramos waived his Miranda Rights and spoke openly to police without the presence of any legal representation. During the interview, Ramos admitted to murdering his female roommate, moving her body, scrubbing the crime scene, and throwing away evidence-including the murder weapon. Ramos then went a step further by telling officers where they could find the knife used in the attack. Ramos was charged with first degree criminal homicide and second degree obstruction of justice.

No harm in requesting an attorney

Many people who are facing criminal charges assume if they tell investigators everything they want to hear, maybe they will either be spared or given better treatment for their extra cooperation. Unfortunately, rarely does it work out in the best interest of the suspect to do so. Sometimes, being open and agreeable with investigators can lead to unexpected or unwarranted charges that may not have been true, such as premeditation of the criminal events. Prior to any police questioning, it is always encouraged to request the presence of an attorney to guide a suspect through the questioning. Even if the evidence is stacked against the suspect, an attorney can still ensure they are afforded all rights, including protecting themselves against self-incrimination.