LSD for Medicinal Use?

LSD, or lysergic acid diethylamide, is a hallucinogen that was synthesized in the late 1930’s for experimental medicinal use and didn’t become an illegal, recreational drug until the 1960’s. Now LSD is trying to make a comeback in the medicinal field to treat several mood disorders.

Recreational to medicinal

Photo by: Mike Licht

A handful of drugs that were previously taken recreationally to “get high” have been making their way into the medical field to treat a variety of health issues.

• Methamphetamine, or speed, is an illegal drug that increases heartrate and blood pressure, decreases appetite, all the while causing the user to feel an extra sense of alertness. Adderall, which is also an amphetamine like meth was added to the market in 1996 to successfully help both kids and adults suffering from ADD, ADHD and narcolepsy.

• Opioids such as heroin are illegal while the closely related opioid morphine is used medically to manage pain.

• Marijuana is another illegal drug that that has been used recreationally for decades and after rediscovering its place in the medical field, is now legal to use with a prescription in 29 states and recreationally in eight.

Hallucinogen for medicine

Photo by: mattwalker69

Many hallucinogens such as ecstasy (MDMA), magic mushrooms, and now LSD are also finding their way into modern medicine to treat a variety of mood disorder issues including:

• Depression,
• Anxiety,
• Alcohol abuse,
• PTSD, and
• Fear and gloom associated with approaching end of life.

Research is currently being conducted on LSD and other hallucinogens to treat many of these mood disorders and is showing promising evidence of stabilizing some of these disorders for months at a time after a single “micro” dose. Participants of these research groups have described their experience on hallucinogens as being mind-opening, with a heightened sense of mental clarity and a better understanding of themselves and their place in life.

Research and decriminalization

Photo by: Helen Harrop

As research continues to show the medical benefits of drugs that were once considered illegal, there is promise that those suffering from mood disorders will be able to soon benefit from the effects of these mind and mood altering hallucinogens under the physician’s care without fear of legal repercussions.

Felony Child Endangerment for Giving Teen Marijuana at Home

Two Utah parents have been arrested for felony child endangerment charges after they gave their teen marijuana to smoke at home.

Questionable reward system

Felony Child Endangerment

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After an lengthy investigation followed by a search of their home, 37 year old Edwin Steward and his wife 37 year old Valerie Steward of Spanish Fork, Utah were charged with felony child endangerment as well as contributing to the delinquency of a minor and drug possession. The Steward admitted to authorities that they gave their 14 year old teenage son marijuana as a reward if he did well in school. They couple also explained that they believed the marijuana helped their son with his studies and to help with medical issues.

Felony child endangerment

The parents of the 14 year old face misdemeanor charges as well as third-degree felony child endangerment. Utah Code 76-5-112.5 states “a person is guilty of a [third degree felony child endangerment] if the person knowingly or intentionally causes or permits a child or a vulnerable adult to be exposed to, inhale, ingest, or have contact with a controlled substance, chemical substance, or drug paraphernalia”.

State law applies at home too

Parents often feel that if their teens want to do drugs, they will do it regardless of whether or not they are permitted to do so. Instead of having their son or daughter use drugs at a friend’s house or someone where no adults are present to supervise the drug use, many parents will have their teens use the drugs in the comfort of their own home. Although their intentions of keeping their teen safe by keeping them close may be done out of love and concern for their child, it is illegal and not seen as a choice made by responsible parents. For legal counsel regarding felony child endangerment or other charges that may be encountered by Utah parents, contact an experienced criminal defense attorney.

Is Using Marijuana For Pain Relief a Safer Alternative Than Opioids?

When someone is battling chronic or acute pain, they are often prescribed addictive opioids when using marijuana for pain relief may be a safer alternative.

Opioid epidemic

6698540291_20f5b96c81_zAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose” and unfortunately, “opioid-involved deaths continue to increase in the United States.” The CDC also stated that “deaths from prescription opioids-drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone-have more than quadrupled since 1999”. This may be due to the fact that “since 1999, the amount of prescription opioids sold in the U.S. nearly quadrupled [even though] there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.“ So why do doctors continue to mass prescribe dangerously addictive and obviously overused opioids to help their patients manage pain?

Marijuana for pain relief

Opioids continue to be used to handle pain because there isn’t much out there that can replace them….legally. Medical marijuana has been tested repeatedly and consistently proves to be beneficial in reducing discomfort for those individuals who struggle with chronic pain. It is also being studied for use in acute pain episodes with positive results. Even though using marijuana for pain relief has been proven to be a successful alternative option that is natural and far safer than opioids, not all U.S. citizens have access to it since several states still consider marijuana an illegal substance. Some states such as Utah go as far to label it a schedule I drug along with methamphetamine and cocaine.

Marijuana use around the nation

Photo by: Satish Krishnamurthy

Photo by: Satish Krishnamurthy

Over the last several years, 26 states as well as Washington D.C. have come to the realization that marijuana isn’t as dangerous as once believed and has proven qualities in fighting chronic and acute pain. Those 26 states and Washington D.C. have all legalized marijuana for medical use. Seven of those states along with D.C. also allow their residents to use marijuana recreationally, just as all states do with alcohol. When will the other states including Utah get on board and legalize marijuana at least for medical use?

Medical marijuana in Utah

There were two bills regarding medical marijuana that Utah lawmakers were working on but unfortunately, only one bill passed and it doesn’t do anything to help those struggling with pain. House Bill 130 that allows medical marijuana to be researched passed the Utah State Legislature, but marijuana has already been researched for medical use; it is time to give pain sufferers in Utah another option besides prescription opioids. Some Utah residents who are frustrated with Utah lawmakers dragging their feet allowing marijuana for pain relief end up taking matters into their own hands. They may cross state lines to take advantage of neighboring states’ leniency towards marijuana only to be busted once they return to Utah with marijuana in their possession or simply in their system. Their attempt to find something else besides opioids to manage pain may land them in jail.

Criminal penalties

Photo by: Victor

Photo by: Victor

Utah law currently prohibits the possession of marijuana and Utah residents are not even allowed to have it in their system when driving. Marijuana metabolites can stay in the system for up to four weeks which makes it impossible for residents to find relief in other states before driving home to Utah. Possession of less than one ounce of marijuana may result in a fine up to $1,000 and the individual charged being incarcerated for up to 6 months.These same charges apply to driving with a measurable amount of marijuana or metabolite of marijuana in the person’s body. Possession of greater quantities or repeat offense may result in greater charges. This may seem unfair for those using marijuana for pain relief, but it is still Utah law.For more information on criminal charges for using marijuana for pain relief, contact a criminal defense attorney.