Is Using Marijuana For Pain Relief a Safer Alternative Than Opioids?

When someone is battling chronic or acute pain, they are often prescribed addictive opioids when using marijuana for pain relief may be a safer alternative.

Opioid epidemic

6698540291_20f5b96c81_zAccording to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “91 Americans die every day from an opioid overdose” and unfortunately, “opioid-involved deaths continue to increase in the United States.” The CDC also stated that “deaths from prescription opioids-drugs like oxycodone, hydrocodone, and methadone-have more than quadrupled since 1999”. This may be due to the fact that “since 1999, the amount of prescription opioids sold in the U.S. nearly quadrupled [even though] there has not been an overall change in the amount of pain that Americans report.“ So why do doctors continue to mass prescribe dangerously addictive and obviously overused opioids to help their patients manage pain?

Marijuana for pain relief

Opioids continue to be used to handle pain because there isn’t much out there that can replace them….legally. Medical marijuana has been tested repeatedly and consistently proves to be beneficial in reducing discomfort for those individuals who struggle with chronic pain. It is also being studied for use in acute pain episodes with positive results. Even though using marijuana for pain relief has been proven to be a successful alternative option that is natural and far safer than opioids, not all U.S. citizens have access to it since several states still consider marijuana an illegal substance. Some states such as Utah go as far to label it a schedule I drug along with methamphetamine and cocaine.

Marijuana use around the nation

Photo by: Satish Krishnamurthy

Photo by: Satish Krishnamurthy

Over the last several years, 26 states as well as Washington D.C. have come to the realization that marijuana isn’t as dangerous as once believed and has proven qualities in fighting chronic and acute pain. Those 26 states and Washington D.C. have all legalized marijuana for medical use. Seven of those states along with D.C. also allow their residents to use marijuana recreationally, just as all states do with alcohol. When will the other states including Utah get on board and legalize marijuana at least for medical use?

Medical marijuana in Utah

There were two bills regarding medical marijuana that Utah lawmakers were working on but unfortunately, only one bill passed and it doesn’t do anything to help those struggling with pain. House Bill 130 that allows medical marijuana to be researched passed the Utah State Legislature, but marijuana has already been researched for medical use; it is time to give pain sufferers in Utah another option besides prescription opioids. Some Utah residents who are frustrated with Utah lawmakers dragging their feet allowing marijuana for pain relief end up taking matters into their own hands. They may cross state lines to take advantage of neighboring states’ leniency towards marijuana only to be busted once they return to Utah with marijuana in their possession or simply in their system. Their attempt to find something else besides opioids to manage pain may land them in jail.

Criminal penalties

Photo by: Victor

Photo by: Victor

Utah law currently prohibits the possession of marijuana and Utah residents are not even allowed to have it in their system when driving. Marijuana metabolites can stay in the system for up to four weeks which makes it impossible for residents to find relief in other states before driving home to Utah. Possession of less than one ounce of marijuana may result in a fine up to $1,000 and the individual charged being incarcerated for up to 6 months.These same charges apply to driving with a measurable amount of marijuana or metabolite of marijuana in the person’s body. Possession of greater quantities or repeat offense may result in greater charges. This may seem unfair for those using marijuana for pain relief, but it is still Utah law.For more information on criminal charges for using marijuana for pain relief, contact a criminal defense attorney.

Paranoid Man Transporting Methamphetamine Calls Police, Gets Busted for Intent to Distribute

A man transporting methamphetamine along I-15 in Utah became paranoid he had a tail and proceeded to call police, only to get busted for intent to distribute.

Attempt to locate not needed

Photo by: Hunter McGinnis

Photo by: Hunter McGinnis

The 27 year old man, who has yet to be identified due to a falsified passport, was transporting more than 36 pounds of methamphetamine in sealed food containers when he called police to report he was being followed. Police arrived to a location off of Interstate 15 where the man was patiently waiting for the officers to arrive. Upon further discussion with the man, police were unable to find evidence the man was being followed, yet he was notably under the influence of drugs. It was then they discovered he was transporting nearly half a million dollars’ worth of methamphetamine.

Don’t sample the merchandise

This isn’t the first time a person transporting drugs through Utah has voluntarily notified police to their whereabouts. Just last January, two men transporting over 20 pounds of marijuana from Nevada to Idaho along I-15 in Utah called police right after crossing the Utah-Idaho border. The incredibly stoned duo were convinced various cars on the road were actually undercover police officers preparing to arrest them. Instead of dealing with the anxiety of waiting to get busted, the 22 year old and 23 year old called the unsuspecting police to get things over with quickly.

Felony methamphetamine distribution

methamphetamine

Photo by: U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Drug possession charges in Utah can be severe, and distribution or intent to distribute charges are far worse. According to Utah Code 58-37-8, “It is unlawful for any person to knowingly and intentionally:

(i) produce, manufacture, or dispense, or to possess with intent to produce, manufacture, or dispense, a controlled or counterfeit substance;

(ii) distribute a controlled or counterfeit substance, or to agree, consent, offer, or arrange to distribute a controlled or counterfeit substance;

(iii) possess a controlled or counterfeit substance with intent to distribute; ( . . . )”

A person convicted of intent to distribute methamphetamine or other Schedule I or II substance is guilty of a second degree felony, or a first degree felony upon subsequent convictions. Those possessing enough marijuana to be considered intent to distribute can face a third degree felony or second degree felony upon a subsequent conviction.

Let someone else represent in court

For those who are facing possession or distribution charges in Utah, even if those charges came about due to self-incriminating phone calls to police, it is always recommended to speak to a reputable criminal defense attorney to speak in your behalf.

Utah Police Find Five Pounds of Marijuana Candy after Responding to a Reported Theft

Police officers in Vineyard, Utah were responding to a report of a theft and ended up finding five pounds of marijuana candy instead.

Think before you call

Marijuana Candy

Photo by: Jorge Romero

20 year old Taylor Sauers of Vineyard, Utah called police to file a report regarding a theft of a handgun, cash, and other valuables from his apartment. When police arrived at the residence, they noted an obvious marijuana odor coming from inside. The smell of marijuana was considered enough probable cause for a search warrant, and when officers returned to search the property, they located nearly five pounds of marijuana candy in the form of gummy bears.

Second degree intent to distribute marijuana candy

Sauers is facing a second degree felony for intent to distribute the marijuana candy, along with two class B misdemeanor charges related to possession and paraphernalia. No information was released regarding the stolen goods, however the large lump sum of money missing is assumed to be drug money and Sauers will not be able to own the handgun anyway if his felony charge sticks. The young adult is likely regretting his call to police, which turned out worse for him that it did for the thief.

One to 15 years

Photo by: houstondwiPhotos mp

Photo by: houstondwiPhotos mp

A second degree felony in the state of Utah carries a possible prison term of one to 15 years in prison as well as a $10,000 fine. Each class B misdemeanor may tack on an additional $1,000 and six month behind bars if sentences run consecutively. With 15 plus years on the line, Sauers and anyone else charged with intent to distribute marijuana candy or any other illegal drugs are encouraged to seek legal counsel.