Utah College Student Arrested on Campus for Prostitution

A Utah college student was arrested for prostitution over the weekend at her campus dorm room.

Struggling student?

Prostitution

Photo by: Washington County Sheriff’s Office

18 year old Ramajeh Marie Patrick who lives on Dixie State University campus in student housing was arrested March 10th 2017 after a lengthy investigation by campus police. There had been reports of multiple middle aged men seen on campus security footage wandering around campus after hours before ending up in Patrick’s dorm room. During the investigation, an online ad was located in which Patrick advertised prostitution. An undercover officer posed as a John and met Patrick at her dorm room, where she was then arrested by officers on scene for prostitution as well as running a massage business without a license.

Prostitution

Utah Code 76-10-1313 states “A person is guilty of sexual solicitation [prostitution] when the person:
a) Offers or agrees to commit any sexual activity with another person for a fee, or the functional equivalent of a fee;
b) Pays or offers or agrees to pay a fee to another person to commit any sexual activity; or
c) With intent to engage in sexual activity for a fee or to pay another person to commit any sexual activity for a fee engages in, offers or agrees to engage in, or requests of directs another to engage in any of the following acts:
i. Exposure of a person’s genitals, the buttocks, the anus, the pubic area, or the female breast below the top of the areola;
ii. Masturbation;
iii. Touching of a person’s genitals, the buttocks, the anus, the pubic area, or the female breast; or
iv. Any act of lewdness. ( . . . )”

Penalties-expected and unexpected

Photo by: Klaus Pichler

Photo by: Klaus Pichler

Prostitution is a class B misdemeanor, punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1000 dollar fine. Strangely enough, the charge Patrick is facing for giving massages is considered a greater offense. Running a massage business without a license is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by up to a full year in jail and a $2,500 fine; More than double the jail term and fine amount possible for prostitution. The details released of the investigation do not include whether or not Patrick was even being investigated for running a massage business, but she confessed to it as well as prostitution when she was being questioned by campus police. Unfortunately, Patrick’s case is another good example of why it is always best to consult with a criminal defense attorney before admitting to anything.

“Happy Endings” Massage Parlors Busted for Sexual Solicitation in Utah

Five “happy endings” massage parlors in St. George Utah were busted for sexual solicitation after undercover officers were offered sexual favors for cash following a massage.

Happy endings massage parlors

Photo by: Morgan Sherwood

Photo by: Morgan Sherwood

Four massage parlors in St. George (and one in Washington City) were part of an investigation after several witnesses came forward to claim they had been offered sexual favors following a massage, otherwise known as happy endings massages. Other residents voiced their concerns about the amount of male-only traffic seen at the businesses in question. Following nearly a half- year of investigation, Utah authorities arrested seven women from five massage parlors for either prostitution, unlawful conduct, or both.

Practicing massage without a license

The five businesses that were part of the investigation were: Japan Massage, Golden Coast Massage, Massage Therapy, and both locations of Dixie Massage. The seven women arrested in the prostitution sting, many of whom were residents of California, were as named: Yuxoang Wang, Li Ying, Dong Ju Jin, Yuhua Liu, Feng Fang Li, Jumei Qin, and Shanmei Olmstead. All of the above women face charges of unlawful conduct for practicing massage without a license, a class A misdemeanor.

Sexual solicitation a.k.a. prostitution

No Sexual Solicitation

Photo by: Walker Larry

Three of the women arrested for unlawful conduct are also facing charges for sexual solicitation. According to Utah Code 76-10-1313, “A person is guilty of sexual solicitation when the person:

a) Offers or agrees to commit any sexual activity with another person for a fee, or the functional equivalent of a fee;

b) Pays or offers or agrees to pay a fee to another person to commit any sexual activity; or

c) with intent to engage in sexual activity for a fee or to pay another person to commit any sexual activity for a fee engages in, offers or agrees to engage in, or requests or directs another to engage in any of the following acts:

i. exposure of a person’s genitals, the buttocks, the anus, the pubic area, or the female breast below the top of the areola;

ii. masturbation;

iii. touching of a person’s genitals, the buttocks, the anus, the pubic area, or the female breast; or

iv. any act of lewdness.”

More charges pending

Authorities stated that more charges for sexual solicitation are likely pending. Those facing charges could include other employees of the massage parlors as well as clients who paid to have happy endings massages. Sexual solicitation is a class B misdemeanor and punishable by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. Those individuals facing charges are encouraged to speak with a criminal defense attorney immediately.

Strict Probation for Utah Sex Offenders

Sex offenders in Utah are required to abide by a strict probationary program until their name is removed from the sex offender registry.

Ten years to life

Photo by: West Midlands Police

Photo by: West Midlands Police

Regardless of the severity of the offense, those who make the registry of sex offenders can expect to stay on that list for at least ten years. The Utah Department of Corrections states that those persons who are convicted of the following crimes will be on the registry of sex offenders for ten years after they are done with their jail or prison time:

“1. Kidnapping
2. Voyeurism
3. Unlawful Sexual Activity with a Minor
4. Unlawful Sexual Conduct with a 16 or 17 Year Old
5. Forcible Sexual Abuse
6. Incest
7. Lewdness (4 convictions required for registration)
8. Sexual Battery (4 convictions required for registration)
9. Lewdness Involving a Child
10. Aggravated Human Trafficking
11. Custodial Sexual Relations (if victim was under 18 years of age)
12. Sexual Exploitation of a Vulnerable Adult
13. Sexual abuse of a minor
14. Attempting, soliciting, or conspiring to commit any felony offense listed above (or in the “life” list below)”

Those found guilty of any crimes on this subsequent list, or those convicted more than once for any crimes on the above list, will be on the registry for sex offenders for the rest of their lives.

“1. Child Kidnapping
2. Aggravated Kidnapping
3. Enticing a Minor over the Internet
4. Rape
5. Rape of a Child
6. Object Rape
7. Object Rape of a Child
8. Forcible Sodomy
9. Sodomy on a Child
10. Sexual Abuse of a Child or Aggravated Sexual Abuse of a Child
11. Aggravated Sexual Assault
12. Sexual Exploitation of a Minor [child pornography]
13. Aggravated Exploitation of Prostitution”

According to this second list, after their sentencing is over, a person who was caught with child pornography is treated the same as someone convicted of rape of a child. While these two crimes seem hardly comparable to many, why does it matter if their name is registered? What does being on the sex offender registry entail?

More than a list of names

Photo by: micadew

Photo by: micadew

When someone is on the registry of sex offenders in Utah, not only is their name exposed for anyone looking through public records, they also have strict laws that they must follow as long as their name is on the registry, even for a lifetime. These laws include restricting:

Where they live. If sex offenders which to move, they must first get permission. This includes moving residences within the same city.
Where they work. Their choice of employment must also be approved by a parole officer.
Public places they frequent. Those convicted of offenses against minors may not be in any area where children meet. This can include: schools, parks, public pools, and even family get togethers.
Who they have contact with. The most obvious restriction regarding who sex offenders have contact with is the victims and their families. Additionally, those convicted of sexual offenses against children may not have contact with minors under the age of 18. This can include children of significant others.
Even how late at night they are allowed out in public. According to the UDC, when required, “[they] must enter into and successfully complete established progressive curfews, or electronic monitoring where available.”

Some of these restrictions can be altered slightly but only after a parole officer has given written permission.

Life changing

Being registered as a sex offender can dramatically change the way a person lives for the rest of their lives. Just as someone is on probation or parole, everything that sex offenders do and everywhere they go is restricted and documented. In fact, according to the UDC, “sex offenders are supervised even more closely and held to higher standards [than those facing probation and parole for other charges].” For those individuals who are facing charges of sexual offenses that could place them on the registry of sex offenders, contact a criminal defense attorney immediately.