Utah Mother Charged After Beating Son with Broom for Not Doing Chores

A Utah mother was charged with child abuse for beating her son with a broom after the teen refused to do his chores.

Extreme discipline

Photo by: Christopher Sessums

52 year old Irene Pupa of West Valley, Utah was arrested after her 14 year old son was found bleeding from the head with multiple abrasions on his body. Upon investigating the incident, authorities discovered that Pupa had become angry at her son after he blatantly refused to do chores. Pupa took the broom her son was supposed to be cleaning with and hit him over the head with it. She then proceeded to strike her son multiple times on his body as well. The boy was taken to the hospital where it was determined he had bleeding on the brain and a skull fracture.

Felony child abuse

Pupa was booked into the Salt Lake County jail on second degree felony child abuse. Utah Code 76-5-109 states that “Any person who inflicts upon a child serious physical injury, or having the care or custody of such child, causes or permits another to inflict serious physical injury upon a child is guilty of an offense as follows:
(a) If done intentionally or knowingly, the offense is a felony of the second degree;
(b) If done recklessly, the offense is a felony of the third degree; or
(c) If done with criminal negligence, the offense is a class A misdemeanor.”

Anger management

Although Pupa was charged with “intentionally or knowingly” harming her son, she may have not wanted to harm him but did so while in a fit of rage. Like many parents, she could have felt extreme anger with her son’s disrespectful tone and may have been dealing with such behavior for a great length of time. Snapping at kids and inflicting pain on them is not only illegal, but studies have shown it to be less effective than other methods of dealing with parental issues. Parenting teens requires a great deal of patience and keeping a level head during arguments, and those who are unable to do so may benefit greatly from anger management and parenting classes to learn some of these other coping methods for dealing with difficult children. These classes may be taken at the choice of parents and are often court ordered following a family incident. Hopefully Pupa and other parents who struggle with disciplining their teens receive the help they needs to successfully parent their children in a loving and effective manner.

Vandals Self-Incriminate Themselves through Social Media

Two vandals were arrested after they self-incriminated themselves through a social media post.

Bragging leads to arrest

Photo by Ryan Adams

23 year old Kevin Hayes and 20 year old Thomas Anderson were arrested after someone saw a Snapchat video by Hayes showing the two individuals inside a Spanish Fork church building that had been recently broken into and vandalized. In the video the two could be heard bragging about what they had done, thus self-incriminating themselves. The person viewing the snap video saved it and alerted authorities. The duo was arrested for vandalism related charges.

Vandalism

The two young men were each charged with burglary for breaking into the LDS church as well as criminal mischief for the vandalism that took place once they gained access to the building. Utah Code 76-6-106 states: “A person commits criminal mischief if the person . . . intentionally damages, defaces, or destroys the property of another.” The penalties for vandalism depend on the value of the property that is damaged. Utah Code 76-6-106 goes on to explain . . . violation of this section is a:

(i) Second degree felony if the actor’s conduct causes or is intended to cause pecuniary loss equal to or in excess of $5,000 in value;

(ii) Third degree felony if the . . . pecuniary loss [is]equal to or in excess of $1,500 but is less than $5,000 in value;

(iii) Class A misdemeanor if the . . . pecuniary loss [is] equal to or in excess of $500 but is less than $1,500 in value; and

(iv) Class B misdemeanor if the . . . pecuniary loss [is] less than $500 in value.”

Authorities estimate Hayes and Anderson caused around $10,000 in damage, increasing both of their criminal mischief charges to the max penalty of second degree felonies carrying a possible prison term of one to 15 years in prison plus a $10,000 fine.

Marijuana Clandestine Lab Busted in 55+ Utah Community

A marijuana clandestine lab was busted in a 55+ community located in Southern Utah and at least one person arrested was as senior citizen.

Semi-retired

Photo by: Mark

63 year old Richard James Hughes, a senior resident in the retirement community of SunRiver St. George was arrested after drug enforcement agents uncovered a marijuana lab Hughes and 38 year old Bradley Cameron Madsen were operating out of Hughes home and garage. Agents delivered a search warrant upon the house while unsuspecting neighbors in the peaceful neighborhood watched in disbelief. Authorities discovered an excessive amount of dried marijuana and equipment likely used to make Dab, a potent butane hash oil with a highly concentrated amount of THC. Dab is used to result in a stronger and more rapid high than normal smoking of marijuana would be able to produce. Hughes and Madsen were arrested on multiple charges including engaging in a clandestine laboratory operation.

Clandestine lab

Utah Code 58-37d-4 states “It is unlawful for any person to knowingly or intentionally . . . engage in compounding, synthesis, concentration, purification, separation, extraction, or other physical or chemical processing of any substance, including a controlled substance.” That section goes on the note that “a person who violates [this subsection] is guilty of a second degree felony punishable by imprisonment for an indeterminate term of not less than 3 years nor more than 15 years.”

Hobby or side job

Hughes’ neighbors were shocked to hear that a fellow resident in the popular retirement community was engaging in illegal activity involving operating a clandestine lab. Some may have wondered if he stumbled into a unorthodox hobby that came with legal hazards or if he picked up a “work from home” job to support himself financially, much like other residents trying to survive in one of the faster growing areas in Utah. Regardless of the reason, according to Utah law, he will have at least “3 years nor more than 15” to figure things out before he is released back into the community.