California Man Arrested For Disturbing a Legislature or Official Meeting in Southern Utah

A California man was arrested for disturbing a legislature or official meeting after he wandered on stage during the 2nd Congressional District debate in southern Utah and used Rep. Chris Stewart’s microphone to oppose vaccines.

Live broadcast

Photo by: Alex Indigo

Congressman Christ Stewart (R-UT) and Democratic opponent Shireen Ghorbani were ending their debate at Dixie State University when a member of the audience got on stage to add his two cents during Stewart’s closing statement. After Stewart claimed to be going off script regarding his closing statements, a random individual decided to make things a bit more surprising by stealing a few moments of the live broadcast to share his views on vaccines. “Vaccine’s cause autism” Corbin Cox McMillen from Citrus Heights California announced before being escorted off stage by campus police. McMillen was arrested for disorderly conduct and disturbing a legislature or official meeting.

Misdemeanor “Wait your turn to talk”

In a law that is reserved for times like this, Utah Code 76-8-304 states “A person is guilty of a class B misdemeanor if he intentionally:

(a) Disturbs the Legislature, or either of the houses composing it, while in session;

(b) Commits any disorderly conduct in the immediate view and presence of either house of the Legislature, tending to interrupt its proceedings or impair the respect of its authority; or

(c) “Official meeting,” as used in this section, means any lawful meeting of public servants for the purposes of carrying on governmental functions.”

Those wishing to let speak to their elected officials about topics of concern are encouraged to write to their nearest representative or attend those Q & A meetings where public discussion is allowed.

Marijuana Clandestine Lab Busted in 55+ Utah Community

A marijuana clandestine lab was busted in a 55+ community located in Southern Utah and at least one person arrested was as senior citizen.

Semi-retired

Photo by: Mark

63 year old Richard James Hughes, a senior resident in the retirement community of SunRiver St. George was arrested after drug enforcement agents uncovered a marijuana lab Hughes and 38 year old Bradley Cameron Madsen were operating out of Hughes home and garage. Agents delivered a search warrant upon the house while unsuspecting neighbors in the peaceful neighborhood watched in disbelief. Authorities discovered an excessive amount of dried marijuana and equipment likely used to make Dab, a potent butane hash oil with a highly concentrated amount of THC. Dab is used to result in a stronger and more rapid high than normal smoking of marijuana would be able to produce. Hughes and Madsen were arrested on multiple charges including engaging in a clandestine laboratory operation.

Clandestine lab

Utah Code 58-37d-4 states “It is unlawful for any person to knowingly or intentionally . . . engage in compounding, synthesis, concentration, purification, separation, extraction, or other physical or chemical processing of any substance, including a controlled substance.” That section goes on the note that “a person who violates [this subsection] is guilty of a second degree felony punishable by imprisonment for an indeterminate term of not less than 3 years nor more than 15 years.”

Hobby or side job

Hughes’ neighbors were shocked to hear that a fellow resident in the popular retirement community was engaging in illegal activity involving operating a clandestine lab. Some may have wondered if he stumbled into a unorthodox hobby that came with legal hazards or if he picked up a “work from home” job to support himself financially, much like other residents trying to survive in one of the faster growing areas in Utah. Regardless of the reason, according to Utah law, he will have at least “3 years nor more than 15” to figure things out before he is released back into the community.

Drug Trafficking Charges for Utah Man Smuggling $300,000 Worth of Marijuana

A Cedar City Utah man was arrested for drug trafficking charges when Oklahoma police caught him smuggling $300,000 worth of marijuana through their state.

It all started with a traffic violation

Photo by: Highway Patrol Images

Photo by: Highway Patrol Images

68 year old Peter Dulfon of Cedar City, Utah was stopped along Interstate 40 in Oklahoma for numerous traffic violations when authorities realized there was more going on. Police took Dulfon into the squad car for questioning and when officers began to cite Dulfon for the traffic violations, he attempted to flee. Oklahoma police realized there was more to the story and ordered a K9 unit to the scene.

A trunk full of pot

When the K-9 unit arrived, the drug dog alerted police to the trunk which officers found full of duffle bags. Inside the bags were vacuum sealed pouches of marijuana, which authorities have estimated weighing between 80 and 120 pounds and had a $300,000 street value. Dulfon, who was originally stopped for traffic violations that would’ve ended with a ticket, was booked into jail on drug trafficking charges.

Drug trafficking in Oklahoma

Oklahoma has recently reduced the penalties for drug possession however drug trafficking and distribution charges are still harsh. Under Oklahoma state law, drug trafficking of more than 25 pounds of marijuana will result in a hefty fine ranging between $25,000 and $100,000 as well as four years to life in prison.

Drug Trafficking

Photo courtesy of: Canadian County (Oklahoma) Sheriff’s Office Facebook page

Had Dulfon been caught in Utah his fine would be far less, ranging at $5,000 to $10,000. Prison time in Utah would have been higher however; up to five years if he had less than 100 pounds of marijuana in his trunk and as much as 15 years in prison if the final weigh in of his stash exceeded 100 pounds.

Drug trafficking vs distribution

The charges Dulfon faced in Oklahoma were at a state level, and reflected the state’s penalties for distribution. Dulfon was charged with drug trafficking though. Although some may drug trafficking and distribution are one in the same, drug trafficking charges can go to federal court which means those convicted would be spending time in federal prison, not state. So what makes distribution charges become trafficking instead? There are two reasons in which a person would face drug trafficking charges as well as distribution. The first but not always the most common is when drug are sold over state lines. The most prevalent cause of federal drug trafficking charges however is not regarding the movement of the drugs, but the vast quantity the suspect allegedly intends to sell.

Federal drug trafficking penalties

According to the United States Drug Enforcement Administration’s Federal Trafficking Penalties, trafficking of less than 50 kilograms (110lbs) of marijuana may result in up to five years in federal prison as well as another fine of up to $250,000. If the amount is over 110 pounds, or 50 to 99 kilograms, that can result in up to 20 years in federal prison and a fine of $1 million dollars. Of course, these prison sentences and fine amounts can be increased for subsequent charges. Authorities mentioned Dulfon had a prior criminal record but failed to elaborate on that information. They only stated that “he’ll be put away for a long time.”

Consult an attorney

Photo by: Phillippe Put

Photo by: Phillippe Put

When it comes to facing distribution or drug trafficking charges in court, it is never recommended to go it alone. Regardless of whether or not defendants are first time offenders or if they have a lengthy criminal record, anyone who has been arrested for distribution or trafficking is strongly urged to consult with a criminal defense attorney to discuss the possible state and/or federal charges they may be facing.