Marijuana Clandestine Lab Busted in 55+ Utah Community

A marijuana clandestine lab was busted in a 55+ community located in Southern Utah and at least one person arrested was as senior citizen.

Semi-retired

Photo by: Mark

63 year old Richard James Hughes, a senior resident in the retirement community of SunRiver St. George was arrested after drug enforcement agents uncovered a marijuana lab Hughes and 38 year old Bradley Cameron Madsen were operating out of Hughes home and garage. Agents delivered a search warrant upon the house while unsuspecting neighbors in the peaceful neighborhood watched in disbelief. Authorities discovered an excessive amount of dried marijuana and equipment likely used to make Dab, a potent butane hash oil with a highly concentrated amount of THC. Dab is used to result in a stronger and more rapid high than normal smoking of marijuana would be able to produce. Hughes and Madsen were arrested on multiple charges including engaging in a clandestine laboratory operation.

Clandestine lab

Utah Code 58-37d-4 states “It is unlawful for any person to knowingly or intentionally . . . engage in compounding, synthesis, concentration, purification, separation, extraction, or other physical or chemical processing of any substance, including a controlled substance.” That section goes on the note that “a person who violates [this subsection] is guilty of a second degree felony punishable by imprisonment for an indeterminate term of not less than 3 years nor more than 15 years.”

Hobby or side job

Hughes’ neighbors were shocked to hear that a fellow resident in the popular retirement community was engaging in illegal activity involving operating a clandestine lab. Some may have wondered if he stumbled into a unorthodox hobby that came with legal hazards or if he picked up a “work from home” job to support himself financially, much like other residents trying to survive in one of the faster growing areas in Utah. Regardless of the reason, according to Utah law, he will have at least “3 years nor more than 15” to figure things out before he is released back into the community.

Utah Police Find Five Pounds of Marijuana Candy after Responding to a Reported Theft

Police officers in Vineyard, Utah were responding to a report of a theft and ended up finding five pounds of marijuana candy instead.

Think before you call

Marijuana Candy

Photo by: Jorge Romero

20 year old Taylor Sauers of Vineyard, Utah called police to file a report regarding a theft of a handgun, cash, and other valuables from his apartment. When police arrived at the residence, they noted an obvious marijuana odor coming from inside. The smell of marijuana was considered enough probable cause for a search warrant, and when officers returned to search the property, they located nearly five pounds of marijuana candy in the form of gummy bears.

Second degree intent to distribute marijuana candy

Sauers is facing a second degree felony for intent to distribute the marijuana candy, along with two class B misdemeanor charges related to possession and paraphernalia. No information was released regarding the stolen goods, however the large lump sum of money missing is assumed to be drug money and Sauers will not be able to own the handgun anyway if his felony charge sticks. The young adult is likely regretting his call to police, which turned out worse for him that it did for the thief.

One to 15 years

Photo by: houstondwiPhotos mp

Photo by: houstondwiPhotos mp

A second degree felony in the state of Utah carries a possible prison term of one to 15 years in prison as well as a $10,000 fine. Each class B misdemeanor may tack on an additional $1,000 and six month behind bars if sentences run consecutively. With 15 plus years on the line, Sauers and anyone else charged with intent to distribute marijuana candy or any other illegal drugs are encouraged to seek legal counsel.

Medical Marijuana in Utah

The acceptance of medical marijuana as a viable option for treatment of several diseases and illnesses is increasing around the nation, yet some states such as Utah are still not sold on allowing complete use of the herb for medical use because of the psychoactive high that can accompany it.

Observed side effects

Medical Marijuana

Photo by: Chuck Grimmet

Medical marijuana has been a hot topic of studies for decades and there have been observed health benefits for those suffering many ailments. While some components of medical marijuana are gaining favor in the health field, one questionable side effect continues to be difficult for experts to ignore. What is likely deterring law makers from completely legalizing medical marijuana use in Utah is the psychoactive “high” that is often accompanied by red eyes, dry mouth, decreased cognitive function, and an amplified desire for food (otherwise known as the munchies).

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

There are two different chemicals in marijuana that have medicinal uses. THC or tetrahydrocannabinol is the chemical in marijuana that gives users a “high” yet this same chemical that causes a temporary high has been shown to be highly effective at relieving symptoms for those suffering with:
• Chronic pain
• Asthma
• Insomnia
• Glaucoma
• Arthritis
• Lupus, and
• Decreased appetite
Even though THC has been proven to be extremely beneficial in the medical field, law makers in Utah have yet to allow its use due to the psychoactive properties. This can be frustrating for many sufferers of the above ailments, yet fortunately not all uses of medical marijuana are banned in Utah.

Cannabidiol (CBD)

Photo by: James Pallinsad

Photo by: James Pallinsad

The second chemical found in medical marijuana is cannabidiol or CBD which does not produce a high, yet is still successful at helping those suffering from:
• Autism
• Anxiety
• Multiple Sclerosis
• Schizophrenia
• Epilepsy, and
• Dravet’s syndrome
Combined with THC, CBD may also be used for those struggling with:
• IBD or Crohn’s disease
• PTSD
• Muscle spasms and tension, and
• Nausea
Currently, Utah’s medical marijuana laws only allow individuals with severe epilepsy to legally use the non-psychoactive CBD extract after first procuring it from a different state. Those suffering with chronic pain or other ailments continue to be disappointed with Utah’s strict laws on medical marijuana, however there is hope on the horizon for allowance of CBD for other ailments as well as the medical use for THC.

Possible change in store for Utah’s medical marijuana laws

After a lack of funds caused bills legalizing medical marijuana to die before ever reaching a vote, One Utah lawmaker, Rep. Gage Froerer, R-Huntsville is planning on sponsoring a bill that allows the use of medical marijuana for a wider range of illnesses which would allow strains containing both CBD and THC chemicals to be used. In case Froerer’s bill doesn’t pass, other legislative leaders are working to put a new initiative on the 2018 ballot while ensuring there is funding to support such an initiative.

Will Utah relax its stance on medical marijuana?

Photo by: David Trawin

Photo by: David Trawin

Currently, 25 states along with the nation’s capital allow the full use of both chemicals in marijuana to be used for medical reasons with a doctor’s prescription. In time there is hope that the remainder of the states will relax their stances regarding the use of marijuana to medical purposes. Until then, Utah residents are warned to refrain from possessing marijuana or visiting neighboring states which may have more lenient laws regarding marijuana use. Utah continues to carry strict penalties for simple possession of marijuana along with charges for individuals traveling from other lenient states with marijuana in their system. For more information on crimes related to marijuana use for medicinal and recreation use, contact a criminal defense attorney.