Utah Drug Dealer Arrested After Calling Police on Someone Else

A Utah drug dealer was arrested last week after calling the police on someone else who assaulted and robbed him.

Raising attention

Photo by: Eelke

Salt Lake Police Department received a credible tip point them toward a local drug dealer after the dealer himself gave officers a call. Trevor Katz of Salt Lake City called police to tell them he was the victim of an assault and robbery. Katz claimed a few people he knew assaulted him and took a laptop. Officers found the suspects and questioned them regarding the assault on Katz. In a tattle for tattle exchange to possibly deflect blame or just to get back at Katz for involving the police, the suspects reacted to the allegations by letting police know that the victim was a known drug dealer.

Online to street drug dealer

It turned out there was evidence supporting the claims surrounding Katz’s criminal entrepreneurship. When Katz was apprehended, he enough Ecstasy on him to warrant intent to distribute charges. Through the investigation, authorities discovered Katz was purchasing drugs such as Ecstasy through a backchannel online platform known as the dark web and having them shipped to his Utah residence. Katz is accused of then taking those illegal drugs and distributing them around the Salt Lake valley. He was arrested and is awaiting charges related to his possession with intent to distribute the pills. Police reports do not state what charges were made for his attackers.

Party pills

Ecstasy is known as a party pill or club drug and is often taken at clubs, raves, and other events with crowds of people, loud music, and flashing lights. Since Ecstasy is so well known across the party scene, many do not understand the legal repercussions that can occur from possessing or distributing Ecstasy to others. Even just a very small dose of Ecstasy could land a person behind bars.

Schedule I drug

Photo by: Chris Breikss

Ecstasy or MDMA is considered by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to be a Schedule I drug. The DEA states “Schedule I drugs have a high potential for abuse and the potential to create severe psychological and/or physical dependence.” They also note that schedule I drugs have “ no currently accepted medical use”. Other Schedule I drugs include heroin, peyote, LSD and even marijuana, the “drug” now legal to use recreationally in 11 states.

Intent to distribute

According to Utah Code 58-37-8, “it is unlawful for a person to knowingly and intentionally:

  • (i) produce, manufacture, or dispense, or to possess with intent to produce, manufacture, or dispense, a controlled or counterfeit substance;
  • (ii) distribute a controlled or counterfeit substance, or to agree, consent, offer, or arrange to distribute a controlled or counterfeit substance;
  • (iii)possess a controlled or counterfeit substance with intent to distribute; or
  • (iv) engage in a continuing criminal enterprise where: the person participates, directs, or engages in conduct that results in a violation of [one of Utah’s drug acts].. .”

That section goes on to note that possession with intent to distribute “ . . . a substance or a counterfeit of a substance classified in Schedule I or II, a controlled substance analog, or gammahydroxybutyric acid as listed in Schedule III is guilty of a second degree felony, punishable by imprisonment for not more than 15 years, and upon a second or subsequent conviction is guilty of a first degree felony”.

Contact an attorney

Many individuals facing criminal charges are aware that they should obtain legal counsel prior to police questioning. Those who are engaged in criminal activity and may be thinking of voluntarily inviting officers over, resulting in self-incrimination, should be prepared ahead of time with the number of an attorney.

Aggravated Charges for Man Who Killed Missing Utah Student

Aggravated charges are pending for a Utah man after authorities located charred DNA evidence of missing college student in the man’s backyard.

Missing college students

Photo by: Tony Webster

In the early morning hours of June 17, 2019, Mackenzie Lueck let her parents know she had arrived at the Salt Lake City Airport before taking a Lyft ride to a park in North Salt Lake. There she met someone in another vehicle and was never seen again. For the next week and a half, Lueck missed her school classes and work and did not take a flight she had scheduled back to California to see her family. Investigators worked tirelessly around the clock, eventually questioning a man that had engaged in electronic communications with Lueck prior to her disappearance.

DNA evidence

Neighbors to the man alerted authorities that the day Lueck had gone missing, the man had been burning things in his backyard with gasoline. After obtaining a search warrant, police were able to find burned remains of Lueck’s belongings as well as charred body tissue. DNA evidence from those findings were linked to Lueck. The owner of the house, 31 year old Ayoola Ajayi was arrested on several charges including aggravated charges of kidnapping and murder as well as obstruction of justice and desecration of a human body.

Aggravated charges

Ajayi is facing four felonies for the following:

  • Third degree desecration of a human body. Utah Code 76-9-704 states “A person is guilty of abuse or desecration of a dead human body if the person intentionally and unlawfully . . . disturbs, moves, removes, conceals, or destroys a dead human body or any part of it”.
  • Second degree obstruction of justice, described by Utah Code 76-8-306 as when a person commits actions with the “. . . intent to hinder, delay, or prevent the investigation, apprehension, prosecution, conviction, or punishment of any person regarding conduct that constitutes a criminal offense”.
  • First degree aggravated kidnapping defined by Utah Code 76-5-303 as “ . . . if the actor, in the course of committing unlawful detention or kidnapping: uses or threatens to use a dangerous weapon . . . or acts with intent;
    – To hold the victim for ransom or reward, or as a shield or hostage . . . ;
    – To facilitate the commission . . . of a felony;
    – To hinder or delay the discovery of or reporting of a felony;
    – To inflict bodily injury on or to terrorize the victim or another; . . .
    – To commit a sexual offense”.
  • First degree aggravated murder. “Criminal homicide constitutes aggravated murder if the actor intentionally or knowingly causes the death of another” and was also involved in sexual offenses, kidnapping, desecration of a human body or other circumstances as stated in Utah Code 76-5-202.

The ultimate penalty

Ajayi is facing up to five years in prison for desecration of a human body, one to 15 years for obstruction of justice and five to life for aggravated kidnapping. The aggravated charges of murder could result in life in prison or the death penalty, depending on if it is charged as a noncapital or capital felony. Section 76-5-202 states “If a notice of intent to seek the death penalty has been filed, aggravated murder is a capital felony. If a notice of intent to seek the death penalty has not been filed, aggravated murder is a noncapital first degree felony”.According to Section 76-3-207.7, noncapital first degree aggravated murder is punishable by “life in prison without parole; or an indeterminate prison term of not less than 25 years and that may be for life. Regarding a capital felony, 76-3-206 notes “the sentence shall be: . . . life in prison without parole or death.

Criminal defense

Regardless of the type of crime committed and whether or not they have been tried already by the public court of social media, anyone facing charges has the constitutional right to be represented by an attorney in a court of law. For more information on the options available for those facing serious charges such as aggravated murder, contact a criminal defense attorney.

Little League Parent Arrested For Aggravated Assault in Utah

A parent of a little league player was arrested in Utah for aggravated assault toward their child’s coach.

Out of control parents

Photo by: Jim Larrison

Last week the rest of the nation watched in disbelief as a video made the rounds on social media showing a group of parents yelling and throwing punches at a kid’s baseball game in Colorado. This week a similar incident took place in Utah as a single parent lost their cool at a game and went after the coach with a baseball bat.

No parent of the year award

37 year old Andrew Bunot was arrested at his children’s game in Roy, Utah after Bunot was displeased with the lack of time his kids got to spend actually playing the game and decided to have words with the coach. Instead of just talking to the coach however, Bunot grabbed a baseball bat and threatened the coach with it. Other parents stopped Bunot as he made threatening advances toward the coach with the bat. Bunot was arrested for aggravated assault while his children watched.

Aggravated assault

Utah Code 76-5-103 states “Aggravated assault is an actor’s conduct . . . that is:

  1. an attempt, with unlawful force or violence, to do bodily injury to another;
  2. a threat, accompanied by a show of immediate force or violence, to do bodily injury to another; or
  3. an act, committed with unlawful force or violence, that causes bodily injury to another or creates a substantial risk of bodily injury to another; and

that includes the use of:

  1. a dangerous weapon . . . ;
  2. any act that impedes the breathing or the circulation of blood of another person by the actor’s use of unlawful force or violence that is likely to produce a loss of consciousness . . .
  3. other means or force likely to produce death or serious bodily injury.”

Since Bunot threatened the coach with a bat which is capable of causing serious bodily injury, he is not facing a third degree felony. Third degree felony aggravated assault is punishable by a fine up to $5,000 and as much as five years in prison.

Poor examples of sportsmanship

Parent outburst during youth athletics is a growing problem, with many parents being verbally abusive to referees, coaches, and even the kids. As the problem with parents at games escalates to cases of physical and aggravated assault, it’s time for parents to start being better examples of sportsmanship to their children so they don’t miss games while sitting behind bars.