Medical Marijuana in Utah

The acceptance of medical marijuana as a viable option for treatment of several diseases and illnesses is increasing around the nation, yet some states such as Utah are still not sold on allowing complete use of the herb for medical use because of the psychoactive high that can accompany it.

Observed side effects

Medical Marijuana

Photo by: Chuck Grimmet

Medical marijuana has been a hot topic of studies for decades and there have been observed health benefits for those suffering many ailments. While some components of medical marijuana are gaining favor in the health field, one questionable side effect continues to be difficult for experts to ignore. What is likely deterring law makers from completely legalizing medical marijuana use in Utah is the psychoactive “high” that is often accompanied by red eyes, dry mouth, decreased cognitive function, and an amplified desire for food (otherwise known as the munchies).

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

There are two different chemicals in marijuana that have medicinal uses. THC or tetrahydrocannabinol is the chemical in marijuana that gives users a “high” yet this same chemical that causes a temporary high has been shown to be highly effective at relieving symptoms for those suffering with:
• Chronic pain
• Asthma
• Insomnia
• Glaucoma
• Arthritis
• Lupus, and
• Decreased appetite
Even though THC has been proven to be extremely beneficial in the medical field, law makers in Utah have yet to allow its use due to the psychoactive properties. This can be frustrating for many sufferers of the above ailments, yet fortunately not all uses of medical marijuana are banned in Utah.

Cannabidiol (CBD)

Photo by: James Pallinsad

Photo by: James Pallinsad

The second chemical found in medical marijuana is cannabidiol or CBD which does not produce a high, yet is still successful at helping those suffering from:
• Autism
• Anxiety
• Multiple Sclerosis
• Schizophrenia
• Epilepsy, and
• Dravet’s syndrome
Combined with THC, CBD may also be used for those struggling with:
• IBD or Crohn’s disease
• PTSD
• Muscle spasms and tension, and
• Nausea
Currently, Utah’s medical marijuana laws only allow individuals with severe epilepsy to legally use the non-psychoactive CBD extract after first procuring it from a different state. Those suffering with chronic pain or other ailments continue to be disappointed with Utah’s strict laws on medical marijuana, however there is hope on the horizon for allowance of CBD for other ailments as well as the medical use for THC.

Possible change in store for Utah’s medical marijuana laws

After a lack of funds caused bills legalizing medical marijuana to die before ever reaching a vote, One Utah lawmaker, Rep. Gage Froerer, R-Huntsville is planning on sponsoring a bill that allows the use of medical marijuana for a wider range of illnesses which would allow strains containing both CBD and THC chemicals to be used. In case Froerer’s bill doesn’t pass, other legislative leaders are working to put a new initiative on the 2018 ballot while ensuring there is funding to support such an initiative.

Will Utah relax its stance on medical marijuana?

Photo by: David Trawin

Photo by: David Trawin

Currently, 25 states along with the nation’s capital allow the full use of both chemicals in marijuana to be used for medical reasons with a doctor’s prescription. In time there is hope that the remainder of the states will relax their stances regarding the use of marijuana to medical purposes. Until then, Utah residents are warned to refrain from possessing marijuana or visiting neighboring states which may have more lenient laws regarding marijuana use. Utah continues to carry strict penalties for simple possession of marijuana along with charges for individuals traveling from other lenient states with marijuana in their system. For more information on crimes related to marijuana use for medicinal and recreation use, contact a criminal defense attorney.

Leave Medical Marijuana Home When Visiting Utah

Those planning on visiting Utah should expect to leave their medical marijuana at home to avoid criminal charges. Fortunately, there are changes upon the horizon, but as for now, marijuana in any form is still not legal to bring here.

Marijuana RX

medical marijuana

Photo by: Neeta Lind

Last week, 21 year old John Arthur Hernandez visiting from California was arrested in St. George Utah after he brought drugs including medical marijuana into the state. The marijuana was in a prescription bottle approved for Hernandez by a doctor from California, but regrettably Utah does not yet authorize the possession or use of marijuana, even with a valid prescription from another state.

Utah working on legalizing medical marijuana

For those living in or visiting Utah who are suffering from chronic pain or illnesses, legalized medical marijuana looks to be in the near future for the beehive state. Two different bills to make medical marijuana lawful recently passed the Utah State Senate and are now on their way to the Utah House of Representatives. Due to the enormous amount of opposition thus far, SB 73, the bill allowing more of the plant than just the CBD oil, had to be adjusted. That bill now restricts medical marijuana use to only those with chronic ailments such as aids and cancer. Additionally, the medical marijuana is not allowed in a cigarette form; only edible versions and extracts.

Schedule classification

Along with the bills to legalize marijuana, there was also a resolution to reclassify marijuana to a Schedule II drug. Currently the United States Controlled Substances Act classifies marijuana as a Schedule I, the same classification as heroin and cocaine. With the abundance of legal changes likely to take place regarding marijuana, those living in or visiting Utah may not realize that strict criminal penalties are still present. For more information on penalties and legal counsel regarding possession of marijuana either for medical or recreation use, contact a criminal defense attorney.